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Monthly Archives: August 2010

Professor Jeff Offutt provides some insight to LogiGear Magazine on how to become a software tester

Professor Jeff OffuttJeff Offutt – Professor of Software Engineering in the Volgenau School of Information Technology at George Mason University – homepage – and editor-in-chief of Wiley’s journal of Software Testing, Verification and Reliability,

LogiGear: How did you get into software testing? What do you find interesting about it?

Professor Offutt:
When I started college I didn’t know anything about computers. I was a math major and in my first semester, my adviser convinced me to take an introductory programming course that was being specialized for math majors. Programming was taught in the business department, so a math-focused class was quite different and the faculty wanted to make sure enough students took it.

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BJ Rollison shares his thoughts on the testing industry in Viet Nam

BJ Rollison, Software Test Architect for Microsoft, is planning to speak at the Viet Nam International Software Testing Automation Conference 2010 (VISTACON 2010) hosted by LogiGear Corporation from 20 – 22 September 2010.

Mr. Rollison started working for Microsoft in 1994, becoming one of the leading experts of test architecture and execution at Microsoft. He also teaches software testing courses for the University of Washington, and sits on the advisory board for testing certification at the University of Washington, the University of California Extension Santa Cruz, and Lake Washington Technical College.

In his keynote address, he will be sharing ideas on some of the influences driving change in software testing, some common problems in our discipline, and suggestions on ways we can meet our future testing challenges.

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Agile Test Development with Action Based Testing – by Hans Buwalda

Agile methods are becoming more and more popular and successful for developing IT systems. Typical properties of an agile method, like Extreme Programming, are continuous user involvement and an emphasis on the testing role (‘Users’ may be the actual users of the system you are creating, customers, or business analysts who provide the requirements on behalf of the end-users). Testing is positioned in agile system development as a driver for system development, with tests often created before the functionality they are verifying.

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Testing in Agile Part 2 – AGILE IS ABOUT PEOPLE

Michael Hackett, Senior Vice President, LogiGear Corporation

If your Agile implementation is not about people, you’ve missed the boat!  The most profound impact to becoming more Agile is happier teams!

Agile manifesto Value #1:

* Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Words like these do not show up in Waterfall or RUP SDLC process descriptions.

Agile cannot get more basic than this: people, the team members, you, are more important than the process documents, best practices or any standard operating procedures. People sitting in a room together, talking, hashing out an issue, live, beats out any project management tool every time.

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Testing in Agile Part 1 – INTRODUCTION TO AGILE

Michael Hackett, Senior Vice President, LogiGear Corporation

Testing in Agile Part 1 – INTRODUCTION TO AGILE

In case you missed the first part of the series in our last magazine issue from Michael Hackett, Agile’s impact on software development teams is huge. For test teams it can be even more pronounced — and good, especially if your existing projects have been problematic.

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