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Monthly Archives: April 2014

LogiGear Magazine – April 2014 – Test Tool and Automation

LogiGear Magazine – April 2014 – Test Tool and Automation

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Automation Selection Criteria – Picking the “Right” Candidates

Identifying which tests to begin with when starting automation  is key to driving testing cycle times down and coverage up

By Robert Galen

So there you are. You’ve done a little research and made the business case to upper management regarding test automation and they bit on the proposal. Surprisingly, they supported you all the way and are extremely excited about how much faster testing can really move, or upper management comes to you with an edict to start automating your testing. You’ve got to improve testing cycle and turnaround times and do it with fewer resources. They clearly believe automation is the only way to achieve these goals. You’re given a nearly blank check to quickly bring automation into play for the next major release—3 months away…

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Test Automation Tool Shopping Guide

A short-list of selection criteria and popular automation tools.

By LogiGear Staff

There are a lot of test automation tools available in the market, from heavy-duty enterprise level tools to quick and dirty playback-and-record tools for browser testing. For anyone just starting their research we’ve put together a short list of requirements and tools to consider.

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Testing Tools: It ain’t Only About Automation!

Test execution and utility tools that can make your job easier

By Michael Hackett, LogiGear

My first exposure to the necessity for testers to have an array of tools was from the groundbreaking article “Scripts on my Toolbelt” by Danny Faught. Danny laid out the ideal approach to any testing job, and it got me thinking “How can I leverage tools to help me?” I needed a group of tools to get my tasks done. I needed to have a full toolbelt! It makes a lot of sense. A carpenter can’t do everything with a saw, he needs dozens of tools to get the job done.

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Avoid Epic Fail. Get Professional Help

Bringing in experts can set you up for automation success.

By Michael Hackett and Joe Luthy, LogiGear Corporation

Test automation isn’t easy when your testing gets beyond a few hundred test cases. Lots of brilliant testers and large organizations have, and continue to struggle with test automation, and not for lack of effort. Everyone understands the value of test automation, but few testing organizations realize its full potential.

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In the News – April 2014

Video: Test Automation – 10 (sometimes painful) Lessons Learned

Test Automation – 10 (sometimes painful) Lessons Learned by

Dominik Dary & Michael Palotas, eBay International: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ0O8p5PajQ

eBay’s European quality engineering team has broad experience implementing end-to-end test automation in different software development environments (agile, waterfall, co located , outsourced, distributed). This presentation illustrates the key lessons learned from a technical and business perspective:

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Letter from the Editor – April 2014

Testing tools – very important, very often overlooked, and very often where mistakes are made.

First, the most common mistake people make about tools is thinking tools are only about test automation! False. Automation tools are merely one type testing tool. We will try to balance this issue between test automation tools and other test tools.

I heard a story about test automation, very recently in fact, of a company that paid a large licensing fee to a major tool vendor, and invested  a lot of training and time to develop a phase 1 automation project. The intent was to scale up the initial phase into a large product suite automated regression tool. After just 6 months the project was dropped due to high test maintenance costs, over-idealized expectations and time demands. A whole lot of money, time, and tester goodwill went down the drain! I have heard too, too many of these stories with test tools, and specifically automation tools.

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Cheap and Free Software Test Tools

Budget-friendly planning and management tools—plus a few others.

By Randall Rice, Rice Consulting

I have been researching sources of test tools and other resources that are inexpensive or free. In some cases, you get what you pay for. However, it is possible to automate some or a lot of your testing using these tools. The good news is that the investment at risk is low.

I have not included prices, since they change often ($ indicates there is a cost). Please visit the web sites to get more information on these tools.

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Book Review of Implementing Automated Software Testing

By Jim Holmes

This book isn’t for everyone, but everyone can get some value out of it. What I mean by that rather confusing statement is that folks working in Agile environments will likely want to throw the book across the room while folks in more bureaucratic environments like CMMI or other waterfall environments will likely get a great deal of value from the book.

I’m an Agile fanatic and I had a difficult time dealing with book’s approach which emphasizes spending large amounts of time creating documentation such as requirements traceability matrixes, detailed test plans, etc. My preferred approach is to have testers working side-by-side as part of a team, creating specifications from user stories/requirements and moving those right in to automated test suites via tools like Selenium, Cucumber, or RSpec.

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Test Tool and Automation Glossary

Utility: A program that performs a specific task related to the management of computer functions, resources, or files, as password protection, memory management, virus protection, and file compression.

Tool: A program or application that software development teams use to create, debug, maintain, or otherwise support other programs and applications. The term usually refers to programs that can be combined together to accomplish a task, much as one might use multiple hand tools to fix a physical object. The ability to use a variety of tools productively is one hallmark of a skilled software engineer.

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