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Category: LogiGear Resources

From The Archives

Over the years we’ve provided an extensive number of articles that provide a wealth of knowledge about outsourcing.  Below are links to some of those articles.

Avoid Epic Fail. Get Professional Help

This article covers the benefits of using professional services team to get great test automation quickly.

http://www.logigear.com/magazine/automation-test/avoid-epic-fail-get-professional-help/

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Video: International Conference on Global Software Engineering

International Conference on Global Software Engineering 2011

“What is the most important issue to resolve in the GSE?”

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Global Software Test Automation: A Discussion of Software Testing for Executives


Authors: Hung Q. Nguyen, Michael Hackett, Brent K. Whitlock
Paperback: 164 pages
Publisher: Happy About (August 1, 2006)
Language: English
Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.1 x 0.5 inches

“Software is complex but I’m tired of finding bug after bug that a 5th grader would have turned in. Virtually every technical product these days includes a lot of software. It’s rare that an engineer can write nearly perfect code. Methodical and thorough testing of software is the key to quality products that do what the user expects. Read this book to learn what you need to do!”

Steve Wozniak, Wheels of Zeus, CTO
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New Exploratory Testing Course by LogiGear University

Incorporate Exploratory Testing into your Test Strategy and find better bugs faster!

Description:

This two-day course is designed to give test engineers a global understanding of exploratory testing. From why we do it and its uses to how we do it and the value of measurement, Exploratory Testing will be examined and practiced to empower test engineers in using this method, finding better bugs earlier, focusing on customer satisfaction and making exploratory testing more manageable and easier to use as an necessary and important test method.

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Four Fundamental Requirements of Successful Testing in the Cloud – Part I

Internet-based per-use service models are turning things upside down in the software development industry, prompting rapid expansion in the development of some products and measurable reduction in others. (Gartner, August 2008) This global transition toward computing “in the Cloud” introduces a whole new level of challenge when it comes to software testing.

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Four Fundamental Requirements of Successful Testing in the Cloud – Part II

Internet-based per-use service models are turning things upside down in the software development industry, prompting rapid expansion in the development of some products and measurable reduction in others. (Gartner, August 2008) This global transition toward computing “in the Cloud” introduces a whole new level of challenge when it comes to software testing.

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Four Fundamental Requirements of Successful Testing in the Cloud – Part III

Internet-based per-use service models are turning things upside down in the software development industry, prompting rapid expansion in the development of some products and measurable reduction in others. (Gartner, August 2008) This global transition toward computing “in the Cloud” introduces a whole new level of challenge when it comes to software testing.

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Testing in Agile Part 4: SKILLS /TRAINING

Michael Hackett, Senior Vice President, LogiGear Corporation

SKILLS

Agile teams need training!

One of the missing links in the implementation of Agile development methods is the lack of training for teams. I noticed in our recent survey on Agile that only 47% of the respondents answered “Yes” that they had been trained in the Agile development process, with over half responding “No.” This number is way too high. The “No” respondents should be closer to 0%!

Have you been trained in Agile development?Percent answered
Yes47.8%
No52.2%

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Testing in Agile Part 3: PRACTICES and PROCESS

Michael Hackett, Senior Vice President, LogiGear Corporation

Summary

Remember that Agile is not an SDLC. Neither are Scrum and XP for that matter. Instead, these are frameworks for projects; they are built from practices (for example, XP has 12 core practices). Scrum and XP advocates will freely recommend that you pick a few practices to implement, then keep what works and discard what doesn’t, optimize practices and add more. But be prepared: picking and choosing practices might lead to new bottlenecks and will point out weaknesses. This is why we need to do continuous improvement!

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Testing in Agile Part 2 – AGILE IS ABOUT PEOPLE

Michael Hackett, Senior Vice President, LogiGear Corporation

If your Agile implementation is not about people, you’ve missed the boat!  The most profound impact to becoming more Agile is happier teams!

Agile manifesto Value #1:

* Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Words like these do not show up in Waterfall or RUP SDLC process descriptions.

Agile cannot get more basic than this: people, the team members, you, are more important than the process documents, best practices or any standard operating procedures. People sitting in a room together, talking, hashing out an issue, live, beats out any project management tool every time.

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