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What is CT and How Do Traditional Test Teams Fit In?

This article was originally published on DevOps.com

It wasn’t long ago that the Dev and test teams would work late hours, focused and rushed to meet a deadline: rapid fixing, reprioritizing and deferring bugs to close out the bug list, move everything to the staging server, do one last run of the regression and pass it over to Ops/IT to move to production. What happened after? No one knew. For most Dev and test team members, Ops is a black box. More often than not, they are oblivious to what happens at Ops, the roles, responsibilities and timelines. One day—long after the drop-dead deadline for Dev and test teams—after delays, questions and changes, the product went live. Continue reading

Michael Hackett
"Michael is also a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics.

Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), available in English, Chinese and Japanese, and Global Software Test Automation (HappyAbout Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries."

In Defense of Test Design

I once consulted for a company to give a week-long course on testing and QA. It was a survey course covering a wide range of topics. As I was setting up, I was chatting with students in the room. One man came over to me and said: “I have been testing for six months, and I am completely bored. I plan on getting a different job in software, either in the company or outside, but it won’t be in testing. I know testing is important—very important—but it’s so boring. It’s not for me. This is my last chance: I hope I can learn something from this class that makes testing more interesting or challenging.”

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Michael Hackett
"Michael is also a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics.

Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), available in English, Chinese and Japanese, and Global Software Test Automation (HappyAbout Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries."

Breaking Out of The Status Quo

Just about every organization goes through times when the internal team cannot execute a testing project fast enough. Reasons range from the magnitude of the project, to lack of an effective test strategy, to staff positions going unfilled. The speed of Agile development and rapid delivery of product also increases testing technical debt.

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Michael Hackett
"Michael is also a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics.

Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), available in English, Chinese and Japanese, and Global Software Test Automation (HappyAbout Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries."

Plus ça Change: The More Things Change…

Michael Hackett – Senior Vice President of LogiGear Corporation and Editor-in-Chief of LogiGear Magazine, on change and software testing.

Change is constant. What’s different today is the rate of change. Moore’s law resulted from the observation that the rate of change in computing power is exponential. The products, services, and software landscape appear just as dynamic. At the same time, we pretty much take for granted the ubiquitous presence of software running our lives and the convenience it brings.

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Michael Hackett
"Michael is also a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics.

Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), available in English, Chinese and Japanese, and Global Software Test Automation (HappyAbout Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries."