Testing Autonomous Vehicles

One of the pioneers of the self-driving car movement was Waymo, which grew out of the Google Labs project that developed the sensors and software to provide a completely autonomous driving experience.

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Tony Luu
Tony Luu has more than eight years of experience in QA and Software Life Cycle Development. Tony is currently a Senior Project Lead at LogiGear Corporation, and has lead project development for several clients, most notably including Linkedin, Cisco and LeapFrog. Tony received a Bachelor of Applied Science in lectrical and Electronics Engineering from Purdue University.

Using Hardware-in-the-Loop in Automotive Software Testing

Testing embedded systems for cars is a daunting task. Today’s modern cars can contain up to 100 or more electronic control units (ECUs). ECUs today control essentially every major function of a car, from acceleration to braking. Furthermore, not all of the ECUs are not manufactured by the same company; thus, it may be difficult to start testing until all the components come together in a prototype car—and by that time, there might not be enough time to completely ensure that the car is ready for the road! 

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Tony Luu
Tony Luu has more than eight years of experience in QA and Software Life Cycle Development. Tony is currently a Senior Project Lead at LogiGear Corporation, and has lead project development for several clients, most notably including Linkedin, Cisco and LeapFrog. Tony received a Bachelor of Applied Science in lectrical and Electronics Engineering from Purdue University.

The Benefits of Automation Testing for Voice First Devices

Amazon Echo and Google home are both vying for control of your smart home. Both of these platforms are ushering in an era where voice first devices will become as ubiquitous as the smart phone is today. Amazon Alexa Voice Service, the technology that powers the Echo family of devices is already boasting over 10,000 skills or functions that can augment the usefulness or entertainment value of the platform, and more are being added all the time by third parties. Amazon is even licensing this technology to be built into third party devices like Sonos Speakers and Ford’s Sync car entertainment system. The need for testing of these custom skills and devices will be become more common place in the future like how mobile app testing is today. There is a unique challenge involved when testing voice first devices. Continue reading

Tony Luu
Tony Luu has more than eight years of experience in QA and Software Life Cycle Development. Tony is currently a Senior Project Lead at LogiGear Corporation, and has lead project development for several clients, most notably including Linkedin, Cisco and LeapFrog. Tony received a Bachelor of Applied Science in lectrical and Electronics Engineering from Purdue University.

Why Crowdsourcing Your Mobile Testing is a Bad Idea

Find/Discover Quality Bugs that meet your test objectives from a dedicated team

Crowdsourcing offers some advantages to ensure that an application is ready for launch. The speed and flexibility to ramp up a team of testers is really remarkable, but there are some issues that can arise if you do not have a concrete test plan created.  A professional test team is trained to assimilate seamlessly into a development or QA team affording it the opportunity to maintain a constant dialogue when there are ambiguity in the testing tasks with a crowdsource partner your primary motivation is compensation by the number of bugs found. Not all bugs are created equally though. A dedicated test team that has been working with your application through several iterations will know your product and be able to find more impactful bugs. If a bug is tricky to reproduce as well, it might night be worth the tester’s time to track down the issue if there is a higher chance that issue would be invalidated.

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Tony Luu
Tony Luu has more than eight years of experience in QA and Software Life Cycle Development. Tony is currently a Senior Project Lead at LogiGear Corporation, and has lead project development for several clients, most notably including Linkedin, Cisco and LeapFrog. Tony received a Bachelor of Applied Science in lectrical and Electronics Engineering from Purdue University.