Letter from the Editor – May 2011

On the whole, everyone wants to do a great job, have a better work environment, happy clients and customers, and to be employed by a company earning lots of money. All great goals!

But this is not always the case. When it is not, you can suggest process improvements, better tool use, different estimating techniques, etc. Suggestions are generally evaluated based upon whether they are opinions, complaints, thoughtful, useful, possible or even mean-spirited.

A large part of my work over the past few years has been consulting on process improvement for entire software teams or specific test groups helping companies and teams achieve their goals. This all sounds great but I have to say─to achieve meaningful change is often painful! My process improvement work includes team skill assessments, team practice or tool use evaluations. What do I see? Lately, it is companies saying they are Agile when they are not; development teams not taking advantage of the recent huge growth in testing tools; and the traditional favorites: bad requirements dooming a project and unreasonable schedules.

We all want to improve but change is sometimes difficult. There are ways to do process improvement well and ways to set-off turf wars. This is why we included the theme of process improvement on the editorial calendar this year. We hope to provide you with insight and experience into how and what to do to make meaningful and beneficial changes leading to happier teams and customers along with less stress, lower costs and waste reduction.

Our test process improvement issue includes my piece centered on key tips on how to get high performance out of your test teams; two articles on Agile Retrospectives from New Zealand Agile consultant 3months and Mark Levison from England, who is also this month’s Spotlight Interview; an additional related article focused on Retrospectives and Post-mortems and whether or not they are more similar than different; Blogger of the Month Rob Lambert links test process improvement to his encounter at an electronic store; Bryan Pendleton reviews How We Test at Microsoft; and the fourth part of the 2010 Global Testing Surveys series with analysis on Test Process and SDLC.

LogiGear magazine continues to be a resource for your software development projects and company needs─good luck!

Michael Hackett
Michael is a co-founder of LogiGear Corporation, and has over two decades of experience in software engineering in banking, securities, healthcare and consumer electronics. Michael is a Certified Scrum Master and has co-authored two books on software testing. Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Wiley, 2nd ed. 2003), and Global Software Test Automation (Happy About Publishing, 2006). He is a founding member of the Board of Advisors at the University of California Berkeley Extension and has taught for the Certificate in Software Quality Engineering and Management at the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. As a member of IEEE, his training courses have brought Silicon Valley testing expertise to over 16 countries. Michael holds a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

The Related Post

Big and complex testing. What do these terms conjure up in your mind? When we added this topic to the editorial calendar, I had the notion that we might illustrate some large or complex systems and explore some of the test and quality challenges they present. We might have an article on: building and testing ...
In the November 2011 issue: Mobile Application Testing, I began my column with the statement, “Everything is mobile.” One year later the statement is even more true. More devices, more platforms, more diversity, more apps. It boggles the mind how fast the landscape changes. Blackberry has been kicked to the curb by cooler and slicker ...
There is a growing software development dynamic of teams without Testers. When I first went into Software Quality, I learned one thing right away: My role was user advocate. My main job was to find bugs. This is the Lean principle called Amplified Learning. We learn about behavior by testing. Even then, validation was not ...
I have been excited about this issue since I included it in the 2011 editorial calendar. This issue of LogiGear Magazine dives into an exploration of agile automation—from the most efficient methods for test automation, to skill sets and better preparation for test teams, and even to understanding the variety of tools in question. We ...
I led the Editor’s Note in our very first mobile issue with “Everything is mobile”, but it is now way beyond what we thought. Mobile has come to mean only the smart phone, mobility is the word that describes everything a smart phone enables you to do. Mobility is more than a device! Mobility is ...
Digital Transformation and IT Modernization projects have shifted into high gear during the COVID-19 pandemic. Tough on some teams is having to do more with less and speed up projects on reduced budgets due to the resulting COVID-19 business climate. On the other hand, other companies are adding funding and pressing the schedule under the ...
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 500 BCE) is credited with saying, “The only constant is change.”   This is a statement that, more than 2,000 years later, still holds true. Today, we are in a time of great change. Everything is in flux. The fact is, we are always in a state of change even if ...
This is a very special issue of LogiGear Magazine. When we were putting together the Editorial Calendar for this year, we decided that instead of a technology issue, we would focus on the human side of quality and test engineering. We want to focus on individual Test Engineers and their jobs. We talked to a ...
As we settle into autumn, we’re taking the time to start some new traditions. This is LogiGear magazine’s first issue on SMAC. SMAC—social, mobile, analytics and cloud. We will be doing more issues in the next few years on these topics since so much of the product world is moving to this development stack.
Hello everyone – I’m hoping each one of us is having a great October. This time of the year is always my favorite, with the changing of the seasons, Fall was always my favorite time of year; it signified change and renewal – but I don’t want to digress to much from what’s going on ...
I have been training testers for about 15 years in universities, corporations, online, and individually – in both a training, managing and coaching capacity. So far, I have executed these various training efforts in 16 countries, under good and rough conditions – from simultaneous translation, to video broadcast to multiple sites, to group games with ...
API testing– an old school technology gets way cool again. APIs and testing them is nothing new; the technology has been around for decades. The most basic definition of an API is an exposed function— a producer (person or company) writes a function and exposes it so that others, consumers, can use it. We copy ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay in the loop with the lastest
software testing news

Subscribe