The Great Reads of Software Testing

Are you looking for the best books on software testing methods? Here are 4 books that should be on your reading list!

The Way of the Web Tester: A Beginner’s Guide to Automating Tests

By Jonathan Rasmusson

Whether you’re a traditional software tester, a developer, or a team lead, this is the book for you! It is packed with graphics, best practices, and hands-on exercises that will teach you how to automate tests, build more robust solutions, organize your tests, level up your skills in user interface testing, integration, or unit testing, and more.

Dear Evil Tester

By Alan Richardson

Do you know how to advance your own testing approaches? Are you in need of testing advice? Dear Evil Tester is packed with advice that will guide you in your testing journey. Alan Richardson shows alternate approaches to automation, communication, exploratory testing, and technical testing, just to name a few.

Software Quality Assurance: Integrating Testing, Security, and Audit

By Abu Sayed Mahfuz

No matter if you’re currently in a testing job or are interested in pursuing a career as a tester, this book will provide you with a lot of information on different types of testing, the importance of software quality and security, and more by providing theoretical and real-world software testing scenarios.

More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team

By Janet Gregory & Lisa Crispin

Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin pioneered the agile testing discipline. In this book, they share agile practices that have evolved over the years and key issues that agile testers have been wanting to know more about. You’ll walk away with a better understanding of how to design better automated tests, how agile testers can improve and expand their skill sets, and how to perform exploratory testing, to  mention a few.

Emily Ngu
Emily Ngu is a Marketing Associate at LogiGear Corporation and manages LogiGear Magazine. She has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing.

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